The Superior Man

As culture has grown increasingly effeminate, men have simultaneously grown bemused with what their role entails in society and whether this role they are occupying in society is one that benefits their progress and is in line with what their inherent nature demands of them. In general, men have become weaker and as unfortunate as it is to say, it is not hard to discern its evidence in the ordinary world. The superior man in present-day society has come to be likened to a faint-hearted, compliant, submissive and gentle dimwit that is exclusively beneficial to the feminine imperative as a consequence of his exploitative nature. The feminine overtly calls for such a man because of his lack of masculinity, or shall I say ‘toxic masculinity’ [excuse that abysmal word] and also since his spineless design will allow her to use him to her advantage. 

Thus, superiority in men has transformed into the very abandonment of masculine virtue and became the embodiment of repulsive feminine qualities which could, in reality, be perceived as vices that obscure man’s goodness and function. Man, by nature, are not easily swayed, they are not designed to be pushed around by a subservient member of the opposite sex, irrespective of what societal norms are employing to manipulate the reversal of gender roles. The gender role reversal is a calamity, not just for men but for women too – in doing so, you are diverting both polarities away from their intrinsic merit; spineless men and arrogant women. The intrinsic merit of man is of supreme importance and its digression is a failure to cultivate what is by nature good and significant and optimally beneficial to his province. And women? They have dirtied themselves with a corrupt agenda that supposedly empowers their better qualities, whatever those qualities are, because they lack the proper reason to consider the likely ramifications of a failing blueprint which leaves them smeared with the disfigurement of immoderate promiscuity and obscene behaviour. 

Anyways, I shall digress from this topic and expand on the depiction of a superior man. If you consider for a moment the qualities that make men prosper, such as orderliness, structure, restraint, persistence, honour, assurance and fortitude, it is reasonable to discern that said elements are scarcely conceivable in men today, with the everlasting falsifications and illusions that permeate mediocrity. Most men are deficient in most of the elements and they will not do anything about it because the initial awareness of it never arises, they live in ignorance of virtue to accommodate the lesser members of society. Not to mention, men have become exceedingly irrational and emotional to the point of stirring abhorrence and contempt, which only makes them hate themselves all the more and enforce their confusion. This chronic frustration never gets the proper treatment for its deliverance because most men seek guidance from other people who are just as mindless as they are and so it goes. 

For a man to come to himself, he must know that something is way out of line and then come to accept this verity without the slightest denial or justification, for both will hinder his progress and slip him back into the trap. Acceptance is harsh and painful, it is not effortless and easy to suddenly admit to your ignorance and weakness. It implies that you have wasted substantial time ignorantly waiting for things to happen or for your issues to resolve themselves and tomorrow never comes. This sudden realization is intolerable to most people, the fragile ego is shattered by a considerable dose of truth which exposes its weakness and incomprehension. 

“Courage isn’t having the strength to go on, it is going on when you don’t have strength.”

Napoleon Bonaparte

Courage is not about being ready or about having the utmost strength to persist, it is more about your readiness and strength of will to endure hardship and pain despite your lack of power. Thus, courage uncovers itself in its authentic colours when one is impoverished and undergoing adversity. It is easier to put on a fearless facade when things are going your way but it takes genuine grit to readily persist with bravery when things are taking a downward turn. The superior man knows courage but also fear. Courage is not the absence of fear, it is the conquering of fear because courageous action wipes out the possibility for terror to repel you into its misleading and depressive ruse. 

“The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing.”

Socrates

A wise man has overcome his sense of arrogant pride and discovered for himself that wisdom begins the moment you acknowledge your shortage of it – putting aside your ego and arming yourself with good reason, so you can shatter limiting or perverted notions and beliefs and begin to perceive reality with clarity rather than obscurity. Furthermore, a life that lacks introspection and careful evaluation is not an honourable life because to contemplate is to gaze at that aspect of your character that necessitates transformation, which is simultaneously the aspect that you run away from. 

The superior man, then, has endeavoured to cultivate and amplify his key strong points; orderliness, restraint, persistence, honour, assurance and fortitude. Orderliness signifies his efficiency, care and diligent effort to preserve equilibrium within his limitless confines and to execute and carry out his deeds with lawfulness and discipline. Furthermore, it is his capacity to remain composed and alleviate the unforeseen chaos of daily life and wrestle with it to his benefit. Restraint signifies his capacity to stray away from impulsiveness, indulgence and heedless pleasure which dampens his character, muddles his senses and spoils his progress. Persistence signifies his capacity to undergo the battles that face him with a firm determination that conflict will propel him forward and in the direction of his impetus. To persist is to pursue excellence and all its prosperous ramifications of virtue. Honour signifies his capacity to know all that is virtuous and beneficial to him, uncompromising integrity and upright moral principles. The former demonstrates his strength of character, the latter his vigorous commitment to his rectitude. With assurance comes great conviction and fortitude, the essential qualities that spring from a tough spirit and a resilient character. This is the very fabric of the superior man, for the man of purpose knows himself to be in harmony with his own essential goodness, ensuring his virtue and dignity is not diminished or suppressed through vice, debasement or dishonesty. 

“It is easy to live for others, everybody does. I call on you to live for yourself.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson

It is easier to undermine your integrity and live to please other people because you are less liable and more leisurely. Living for yourself requires resilience and a strong backbone to keep you upright. Furthermore, it entails a certain responsibility and accountability to endure the conflict that is thrown at you with conviction and bravery and to understand that discomfort is necessary for growth and expansion. Life is not about making the right decision, it is about throwing yourself in disorder and learning to resourcefully and diligently cope with it, irrespective of ‘negative’ outcomes. What you deem a negative failing will turn out to be an essential building block on your journey towards mastery and nobility. Too many people are hung up on the notion of ensuring they don’t take a bad step, avoiding or lessening the likelihood of failure at all costs. This is an unnecessary precaution, if your outlook is one of timidity and aversion, you will never be readily disposed to take risks. Risks are inevitable, exciting and rewarding so long as you are willing to pursue them with a sense of boldness and faith. Conversely, if you perceive them in a bad light, you will fail to acknowledge their importance and recompense and be entrapped in ignorant blindness. 

“You cannot swim for new horizons until you have courage to lose sight of the shore.”

William Faulkner

0 Shares:
Leave a Reply
You May Also Like
Read More

On Learning and Wisdom

Agesilaus was once asked what children ought to be taught, he replied, ‘What they should do when they are grown up.’ Further, when he encouraged Xenophon to have his boys raised in Sparta, it was neither for rhetoric nor argumentation, but to learn the most worthy discipline there is: ‘how to obey and how to command.’ 
Read More

Sense and Responsibility

Courageous deeds bring out the worth of man: the battleground being the expanding landscape, where safety is off duty and menace ever nearby.
Read More

On Persistence

If truth be told, is there a more betraying mark of singular character than your ability to show determination with things that clamour for courage and tenacity when the longing to relent is exceptionally irresistible? That sensible proverb is ever pertinent, “Constancy is the mark of virtue.”
Read More

Purpose, Pain and Progress

We engage in the most rigorous self-analysis in the face of terrible misfortune. It aids you in scrutinizing your life more earnestly and with greater zeal. It is at this point that you reach a pivotal breaking point that incites rapid improvement, as you are altogether bullied into rectifying things: not tomorrow, not in an hour, but right this very moment with the utmost gravity and tenacity.
Read More

On Anger

Man should not pursue pleasure by a desire for gratification and satiate himself with vengeance. For, to rejoice in punishment is animalistic, and to later be remorseful about it is womanish. By preference, man should hold back till both pleasure and anguish abate and his rationality recovers.